Volume 4, Issue 6

Issue 6 of Volume 4 includes the winners of the Atlanta Writers Club contests: the Natasha Trethewey Prize for poetry and the Terry Kay Prize for fiction. These two pieces—as well as the photography and visual art we’ve published this month—center themes of family, relationships, community, and the difficulties of working through poor health.

Natasha Trethewey Prize winner Rick Rohdenberg explores the genesis of music between Chopin and George Sand in his poem, “A Winter in Majorca.”

In “Where Do We Go From Here,” Terry Kay Prize winner Jarrett Kaufman dives into the troubled relationship of Otis and Fay, whose experience with food and weight gain and loss forces them to question their love for each other.

Photographer Harvey Castro’s “Lxs Meninxs” captures a moment in the life of a community in Mexico,a busy scene that developed in front of his eyes.

Lastly, Dev Murphy’s illustration “Something the Heart” utilized a stream-of-consciousness technique to examine an archaic phrase, “the heart of me,” and in the process calling to mind our constant state of distraction and inattention to the world around us.

Where Do We Go From Here? | Fiction

“Months passed. Otis worked at his diet and exercise regimen, but he never felt satisfied. He’d never run far enough and he’d never eat healthy enough foods. Some nights, Fay locked herself in the bathroom, and Otis would sit outside the door and talk to her about a time where they’d diet together. He chatted about days they’d take beach vacations to Cancun. “I disgust you,” she’d yell and when Fay spat vile drivel like that, Otis became restless. So he’d leave.”

A Winter in Majorca | Poetry

“He is improvising as he composes,/ jotting down each chord, crossing out,/ jotting down again, seeking the one key/ that will transform it.”

Lxs Meninxs | Visual Art

“I miss this moment right here—that instant when you walk into a scene or see it develop in front of your eyes. You start to determine what’s going in that frame, composing. You instantly go into cyborg mode, analyzing the scene, your foreground, midground, background, are there distractions, overlaps, measuring the edges of your frame, etc. That moment doesn’t last but an instant, and most times, just because you clicked the shutter button doesn’t mean it’s going to work. But sometimes it does – Oaxaca, Mexico”

Something the Heart | Visual Art

“In this illustration, the poetry and archaicness of “the heart of me” is preceded by a careless “something something,” as if the speaker is too distracted or tired to clarify their meaning. This comic, like many of Murphy’s comics, is a one-off, produced in a moment of absent-mindedness in which text and image are put on the page stream-of-consciously.”

Book Reviews

Interviews

Art & Photography

Lxs Meninxs | Visual Art

Lxs Meninxs | Visual Art

“I miss this moment right here—that instant when you walk into a scene or see it develop in front of your eyes. You start to determine what’s going in that frame, composing. You instantly go into cyborg mode, analyzing the scene, your foreground, midground, background, are there distractions, overlaps, measuring the edges of your frame, etc. That moment doesn’t last but an instant, and most times, just because you clicked the shutter button doesn’t mean it’s going to work. But sometimes it does – Oaxaca, Mexico”

Something the Heart | Visual Art

Something the Heart | Visual Art

“In this illustration, the poetry and archaicness of “the heart of me” is preceded by a careless “something something,” as if the speaker is too distracted or tired to clarify their meaning. This comic, like many of Murphy’s comics, is a one-off, produced in a moment of absent-mindedness in which text and image are put on the page stream-of-consciously.”

Homage to von Humbolt | Visual Art

Homage to von Humbolt | Visual Art

“What interests me most is the way in which the human body/anatomy corresponds to structures in nature, plants, trees, and the landscape. This can manifest itself either internally or externally in the form of patterns, designs, or metaphorical context; the subtle yet enchanting similarities between the inner life of plants, trees, and humans. What are humans if not plants, trees, and fungi, themselves made-up of organic material?”

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