Vol. 3, Issue 3

“white person asks me what my pronouns are and king leopolds my body into parts.
asks me if i recognize my people’s viscera.
asks me to give these gendered phantom limbs a name that will not trip up the master’s throat.
when my tongue refuses,
answers “nigga” like upcycled oppression;
like the whip in my hand;
i remember that even the ways i can call out to this flesh map have been colonized.
that this block has been long gentrified.”

-Mia S. Willis, “an interview with olóòkun.”

She and Shakespeare and I | Nonfiction

She and Shakespeare and I | Nonfiction

Katherine. Bianca. The Old Widow. Petruchio. Baptista. Lucentio. Tranio. Gremio. Hortensio. Grumio. Biondello. Christopher Sly. (For a story all about how women are supposed to behave, there is a shocking lack of female representation.) When reading and directing...
an interview with olóòkun. | Poetry

an interview with olóòkun. | Poetry

in the religion native to west africa’s yorùbáland, olóòkun is the owner of all oceans. depicted with varying gender presentations both in yorùbáland and throughout the diaspora, olóòkun is also the protector of africans who were carried away during the maafa, the...
Spring Baby | Visual Art

Spring Baby | Visual Art

Digital Collage Before my granddaughter was born, a friend said, ‘A spring baby, how lovely…’ and the words stayed in my head. Months later, in the middle of a bleak, Scottish winter, I longed for flowers and working on this image was a welcome break from the snow and...